Jarinyanu David Downs (c.1920-1995)

 
   Kurtal and the Rainbow , 1994   Natural earth pigments and synthetic polymer paint on linen bears artist's signature, dimensions, catalogue number 028/94 and 'Commissioned by Duncan Kentish' on the reverse  101 x 84cm   Price:   SOLD    Provenance:   Painted in 1994 Commissioned by Duncan Kentish Fine Art, Adelaide Private collection, Sydney   Jila  Kurtal is an important rainmaking centre and home of its eponymous ancestor in the eastern region of the Great Sandy Desert region of Western Australia. Jarinyanu and his brothers learnt to perform the ceremony to make rain at the  jila  (permanent waterhole) before they came north to station country and later Fitzroy Crossing, Western Australia.  Jarinyanu’s invention of painting the figurative forms of ancestral beings such as Kurtal has set him apart from any other Kimberley artist. Indeed Judith Ryan, Senior curator of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Art at the National Gallery of Victoria has stated, “Jarinyanu is the only Western Desert artist who constantly visualizes the unseen and intangible  ngarrangkarni  actors in human form with sacred markings and attributes’. [1]   Jarinyanu is represented in all major Australian public institutions. In the mid 1980s he was Chairman of the newly established Mangkaja Art Centre, a position he was awarded as a fine carver and artefact maker. He was one of the first amongst his desert peers to shift his attention, in the early 1980s, away from artefacts to painting.   In 1986 Jarinyanu developed a strong friendship and professional working relationship with Duncan Kentish. In a short timeframe Kentish oversaw Jarinyanu’s inclusion in over nine international exhibitions and mounted a number of important solo shows, most notably at Bonython-Meadmore Gallery, Sydney (1988), Chapman Gallery, Canberra (1991); and Ray Hughes, Sydney (1995). In 2016, following Kentish’s passing, Greer Adams Fine Art held the first solo show of the artist in over 20 years.  Greer Adams is now advisor to the Estate of the Artist.   [1]  Judith Ryan, ‘Art of Fitzroy Crossing’ in Images of Power, Aboriginal Art from the Kimberley, Melbourne: National Gallery of Victoria, 1993, p.71.

Kurtal and the Rainbow, 1994

Natural earth pigments and synthetic polymer paint on linen
bears artist's signature, dimensions, catalogue number 028/94 and 'Commissioned by Duncan Kentish' on the reverse

101 x 84cm

Price: SOLD

Provenance:

Painted in 1994
Commissioned by Duncan Kentish Fine Art, Adelaide
Private collection, Sydney

Jila Kurtal is an important rainmaking centre and home of its eponymous ancestor in the eastern region of the Great Sandy Desert region of Western Australia. Jarinyanu and his brothers learnt to perform the ceremony to make rain at the jila (permanent waterhole) before they came north to station country and later Fitzroy Crossing, Western Australia.

Jarinyanu’s invention of painting the figurative forms of ancestral beings such as Kurtal has set him apart from any other Kimberley artist. Indeed Judith Ryan, Senior curator of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Art at the National Gallery of Victoria has stated, “Jarinyanu is the only Western Desert artist who constantly visualizes the unseen and intangible ngarrangkarni actors in human form with sacred markings and attributes’.[1]

Jarinyanu is represented in all major Australian public institutions. In the mid 1980s he was Chairman of the newly established Mangkaja Art Centre, a position he was awarded as a fine carver and artefact maker. He was one of the first amongst his desert peers to shift his attention, in the early 1980s, away from artefacts to painting. 

In 1986 Jarinyanu developed a strong friendship and professional working relationship with Duncan Kentish. In a short timeframe Kentish oversaw Jarinyanu’s inclusion in over nine international exhibitions and mounted a number of important solo shows, most notably at Bonython-Meadmore Gallery, Sydney (1988), Chapman Gallery, Canberra (1991); and Ray Hughes, Sydney (1995). In 2016, following Kentish’s passing, Greer Adams Fine Art held the first solo show of the artist in over 20 years.  Greer Adams is now advisor to the Estate of the Artist.

[1] Judith Ryan, ‘Art of Fitzroy Crossing’ in Images of Power, Aboriginal Art from the Kimberley, Melbourne: National Gallery of Victoria, 1993, p.71.

 
Greer Adams